Spotify has taken my “LIGHTS OUT Podcast” down

For your information:

Hi,

 

We have found your podcast content to be in violation of our content policies, and we have removed it. You can read more about our podcast content policies in our Spotify for Podcasters Terms & Conditions.

 

LIGHTS OUT Podcast – feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:14263/sounds.rss

 

If you’re a creator looking to get your music on Spotify, you can check out our How do I get music on Spotify FAQ on Spotify for Artists. You can also use one of our preferred providers to distribute your music.

 

Please do not respond to this email as replies will not be monitored.

 

Sincerely,
Spotify

What has been a real issue on SoundCloud is now an issue on Spotify. I know that all the producers and labels are happy when I showcase their music on my shows. This system is broken and dysfunctional. Music that gets promoted via podcasts and radio shows gets blocked by a flawed copyright monitoring system. It’s not humans that make those individual decisions, it’s algorithms.

Worry not, the podcast and its individual shows is still available on SoundCloud, MIXCLOUD and via RSS feed:

 

Dear Spotify, if you read this: the entire fucking point of a DJ mix is the DJ playing records of other people. That promotes the record, the artist and the label. This is how underground electronic music works. I can’t believe I have to explain this to the world’s biggest music streaming company. You wanted podcasts, you get podcasts. Now, you kick the podcasts of DJs like me. This is ridiculous.

P.S.: The system is very slow. It took them around 2 months to find out that I promote other people’s music on my podcast, which is the entire point of playing and recording DJ sets and making them available as podcasts.

Interview with myself

I recently stumbled across a series of interviews by The Guardian, and I got totally lost in reading those interviews for hours. Absolutely fascinating.

Then the idea came up in me to collect these questions and answer them myself, an interview with myself, so to speak. I have done something like this before, but only answers, without the associated questions.

Here is the result:

When were you happiest?

When I was 15 years old and met my great love. Every time we met, looking into her face was like the most beautiful sunrise.

I’m Capricorn, very determined when it comes to achieving my goals. I can only give up when something is not important enough to me, otherwise that’s not an option. That’s why we are together today, against all odds, and there were lots of very hard ones.

Life has done a lot of scars to both of us, but when I see her face, the sun is still rising. Every day.

What is your greatest fear?

I’m more afraid of life than of death. This fact itself sometimes scares the people around me who I care about. I myself am hardly afraid of anything, except for the brutality, ruthlessness and lovelessness that people are capable of.

What is your earliest memory?

There are very diffuse, weird images inside of me, of which I don’t know exactly whether they are reality or fantasy.

What is your most treasured possession?

Objects mean nothing to me, but I love my Yamaha HS 8 studio monitors. They make music sound the way it’s been recorded.

Who would you play in the film of your life?

Maybe the young Gérard Depardieu. I once read that he has become an idiot who drinks himself to death, perhaps because he cannot cope with the loss of his son. He said something about his son’s death that touched me deeply: “My little Guillaume was too brilliant and fragile for this world.”

I find this statement very loving.

What is your favorite word?

Flower.

What do you owe your parents?

Nothing but misery.

What does love feel like?

Frightening.

What did you want to be when you were growing up?

A rock star, an architect or an archaeologist.

What is your favourite smell?

Fresh-baked bread.

What is your guiltiest pleasure?

Wine.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?

“Fuck.”

What is the trait you most deplore in others?

Ignorance.

Which book changed your life?

“Fate as an Opportunity” by Thorwald Dethlefsen. I was 17, absolutely clueless, and this book gave me a chance to develop a world view, even if it was a rather depressive one.

What is the worst thing anyone’s ever said to you?

“Without my money you won’t get anywhere.” My father said that shortly before his death. That was just one of many injuries, but it was the most disgusting.

What was the best kiss of your life?

Wilma’s first kiss when she was a little puppy. It went straight to the heart, the purest form of love.

What has been your biggest disappointment?

My family.

Is it better to give or to receive?

Both. But the order is important: always give first.

Which living person do you most despise, and why?

The orange piece of shit that other pieces of shit put on a throne that makes him the most dangerous piece of shit in the world.

If you could go back in time, where would you go?

The year 17 A.C., Jerusalem.

If you could edit your past, what would you change?

As great as the temptation is, and believe me, it is very big: nothing. Everything is as it should be. I think one of the most important things to learn in life is acceptance. Precisely because it is also the most difficult.

Where would you most like to be right now?

I have an imaginary place in my head that I’ve been carrying with me all my life. It is a plot of land on a plateau, high above the adjacent sea. In the background – or foreground, depending on the perspective – are beautiful mountains with snow-capped peaks. There is a Roman-style house on the property with an atrium. My retirement home. I would like to get this done before I depart from this life.

Tell a joke.

If a man comes around the corner, the bus is gone. If a bus comes around the corner, the man is gone. If they both come around the corner, the corner is gone.

Tell a secret.

If I tell a secret, it’s no longer one.

Have you ever said ‘I love you’ and not meant it?

Yes. I didn’t want to hurt or was a coward. Or both.

How often do you have sex?

I’m not counting something like that. But it feels just right.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?

That I conquered fear.

Which living person do you most admire?

There is not one person I admire the most. I admire every person who manages to do what is right and does not primarily think of himself first.

But I have musical role models. I think the one I admire the most is Mark Knopfler. His ability to write and play music is incredible.

Aside from a property, what’s the most expensive thing you’ve bought?

Drums. Drummers have the most expensive passion among all musicians. A cymbal stand costs as much as a guitar. Of course, depending on the model, but you get a decent guitar for a decent cymbal stand.

What would your superpower be?

I already have a superpower. I can create music.

What makes you unhappy?

The incredible amount of bad music that is commercially successful.

What or who is the greatest love of your life?

See answer #1.

How do you relax?

With wine and good music.

What do you most dislike about your appearance?

As a young man, I thought that was important. Today that tends to zero. In this respect, I’m no longer interested in my external imperfections.

Who would you invite to your dream dinner party?

Mark Knopfler, Mike Oldfield, Gavin Harrison, Simon Phillips and my parents in one room. The latter should only listen to what the others have to say. Maybe then my parents would finally understand why I have to make music.

What is the closest you’ve come to death?

I almost drowned in the open sea. I was saved unexpectedly at the last moment.

What is your most unappealing habit?

Honestly, I don’t know. Others can certainly say that better.

What is the top of your bucket list?

I really want to find the time and silence to finish my album.

To whom would you most like to say sorry, and why?

To everyone who needs an apology from me to deal with injuries I inflicted on him or her.

What single thing would improve the quality of your life?

The abolition of money. Mankind doesn’t need money. The planet offers all resources humans need. We have a distribution issue called greed.

What keeps you awake at night?

The future that people of my generation will leave behind for the next generation.

What song would you like played at your funeral?

This song has been with me all my life. A lullaby for adults. And since I then go to sleep, that fits very well. It may also comfort the participants at my funeral. I don’t know any other song that creates such warmth and peace in me as this one.

How would you like to be remembered?

It is not important to be remembered, only what you do in life should be. As a person I’m as insignificant as anyone else.

If you could bring something extinct back to life, what would you choose?

Democracy.

What is the most important lesson life has taught you?

Immediately after birth, all sorts of things are expected from you. They break your wings as quickly as possible before you even start flying.

Aunt Berta’s wet kisses on your still innocent child’s face only delight Aunt Berta. Uncle Alfred has a secret boner when you reluctantly sit on his lap. You endure it because there is a little pocket money or small gifts at the end of the evening, because that way you have already been conditioned.

A little later, you are expected to be compliant, shut up and consume. Almost everyone wants you to become someone you are not.

All my own experiences? Yes. 100%.

The lesson I have drawn from this is: don’t fulfill expectations, find your way back to yourself as quickly as possible, heal, become a natural being and do meaningful things.

Brutal facts after leaving Facebook

After a few months without Facebook and some new releases, the result is disastrous when it comes to marketing my music. I usually sold a few hundred copies at Bandcamp in the first few days after new music was released. There is absolutely no comparison to that now, I am far from it, to put it mildly.

I had the most visitors to my website through Facebook, and most of the buyers of my music came through Facebook. Twitter absolutely cannot close this gap. Where Facebook was responsible for 80% influx, Twitter is only 10%. Neither my own website nor any social network can compensate for this.

These are facts and they bother me massively. I hate Facebook, think it’s wrong, harmful, and also criminal. My dilemma is quite big, accordingly.

I currently have to put up with the question of whether I can afford the absence of Facebook as someone who wants to make money with music (not necessarily, but want to). I am very busy in the studio and have lots of releases planned. I have never been more creative than now, and it hurts me that things are going down on the business side of things… just because of the fact that I left Facebook.

It would be very nice if you would support me if you like what I do. You can either buy my music on Bandcamp, stream it on Spotify or Apple Music or donate something. I don’t want gifts, you know that I always give more than I ask back. 😉

Thank you very much!

“PARANO” Film I Scored Music for Wins “The Van Leer Award for Best Director of a Documentary” at Jerusalem Film Festival

Parano Film PosterHuge congratulations to Ariel Semmel, who won “The Van Leer Award for Best Director of a Documentary” at Jerusalem Film Festival!

Despite having only contributed a small portion of music to “PARANO” for Isreali director and friend Ariel Semmel, I’m proud and happy to hear that my music got amazing reviews.

Ariel: “Your music captures everybody in the beginning of the film!”

Official Trailer

 

It’s a great gain to be working with Ariel, who’s a professional with every fiber in his body. His film is touching, shocking, emotional, brutally honest and the some of bravest self-exposures I have ever witnessed. When I watched one of the earlier edits of the film — in order to prepare myself for the music to be written — I needed days to process what I had seen, the movie’s that intense.

You might think from the “cover of the book”, this movie is about a distraught guy who thinks he’s been abducted by aliens. Not even close. This movie is much more than that. It touched me every second, frame by frame.

For Ariel I wish that PARANO gets the attention and rewards it deserves. Go check out details about the film here:

Rumours About My Retirement — A Statement

Ingo Vogelmann
Not retired, yet.

There seems to be a rumour that I retired. Recently I also received messages from fans who asked me directly. I think it’s time to explain, and not just on this subject.

First of all: no. I haven’t retired, yet, nor do I plan so anytime soon. But I have either shut down or minimized certain activities that affect my work in the music industry, on the other hand, I draw my energy to other (and partially new) things.

About my management activities in the music industry

As you may know, I no longer work for FRISKY. I also removed my shows from the station, because I wanted it that way. I was not officially fired. At a certain point, FRISKY simply stopped communicating with me for reasons that to this day are incomprehensible to me, unless I suspected fraud. After all, I was the one who quit after nobody talked to me anymore. I got some sort of explanation (very much too late), but it wasn’t satisfactory at all. Despite the fact that it assumed completely false accusations that looked strongly like made up, for the sake of accusation. I can not spread the whole story publicly, it’s still a legal process that is far from over. I still have demands that I have to enforce in court.

With great pleasure I am Head of A&R for Pro B Tech Music. This job usually takes place in the background, which is why you do not notice much of it. But I am very busy. If you have demos, send them to me. 😉

Studio work

I direct my energy more and more to the work in the studio. That means I produce, mix, master and compose a lot, both for myself and for clients. That’s great fun. I couldn’t imagine quitting this, ever. I will probably do this until my very last breath. I just love music too much.

Radio shows

I do that. Still. As long as I enjoy it and my time allows it. I don’t know when the time has come when it stops being enough fun to continue, but you will notice.

Gigs

Quite clear: I’m picking out the really good ones. I’m tired of stupid discussions with promoters that do too much coke and have an incredibly inflated ego or want to fool me. I do not play for free drinks, travel expenses and hotel. BTW, I never did that.

To be honest: I have been involved in the music industry for about 25 years. I have experienced many beautiful things, seen many places and people and experienced unforgettable moments. But also many bitter disappointments. And I – 45 years old – do not feel like it anymore. Really not. I might be a bit stupid, but not that stupid.

And here is the most important thing…

Over the years, I have neglected far too many things. Friends and partnership, for example. Family. A normal life. I haven’t always given the really important people in my life the attention and energy they deserve. Although I always had the best intentions, I have been terrible on many subjects and fucked up opportunities.

At 45, I’m full of regrets that I need to process — believe it or not. Your own mistakes make you either go full retard (pardon the wording) or they make you humble and thoughtful. I want to be a better version of myself and live the life I could have lived earlier if I hadn’t clinged to stupid things and false perceptions. I also want to have more time and energy for private passions and hobbies, and I also want to really listen to the music I love more, not just skip through it, because I need to evaluate it.

I’m at an age where you do not have to get involved with everything or prove anything. I (almost) only do things that I enjoy doing. A few things I did before have only taken but not given back enough, or at all. Fuck this.

In a nutshell, I have no time or energy to waste. This life is short and will be over sooner or later, and I’m the only one responsible for my happiness until that day has come.

However, that’s the short explanation on the state of things. If necessary, I will explain more at some point. Thanks for your attention and for your support! I sincerely hope you understand what this is about, and what not.

12 Things You Should Never Say To a Musician

  1. So Are You Trying To Be A Musician

    I am a musician. Not trying. Trying to be a musician is watching the first YouTube video on how to hold a guitar. Not what I have done for the past 15 years. That is BEING a musician.

  2. You Sound Like…

    I know you’re trying to be nice by putting me in good company, but musicians want to feel original. We don’t want to hear we sound like everyone else. That we’re unoriginal. It’s fine for you to sell your friends on listening to someone new by comparing them to well known artists, but when talking to a musician, the best compliment is “you sound like YOU and it’s awesome.” Unless you’re talking to a pop producer, then yeah, “it sounds like Katy Perry” is probably the best compliment you could give.

  3. You Should Try Out For American Idol

    I will slap you.

  4. When Am I Going To Hear You On The Radio?

    When your radio plays better shit.

  5. You Should Be On The Voice

    Because that’s a career builder. Right Jermaine?

  6. You Must Love Karaoke

    No, actually, I hate karaoke because I have to listen to you sing.

  7. Can I Get On The List? Plus 1?

    You don’t have $10 to support my music, but you have $50 for the round of shots you just bought everyone?

  8. What’s Your Real Job?

    It’s this little field called music. It’s way more real than those TPS reports you put together for the Bobs.

  9. What’s Your Backup Plan

    What’s yours?

  10. It Will Be Great Exposure

    Meaning, it doesn’t pay. No thanks.

  11. I Have A Great Idea For A Song

    And I have a great idea on how you can fix my faucet better. But let’s keep these things to ourselves.

  12. Free Bird

    That stopped being funny in ’97.

 

Source: 12 Things You Should Never Say To a Musician | Digital Music News

Update on the album production

The album

I’ve done around 30 different mixes, tried like 10 different guitars, mixing the drum kit and making it sounding right has taken an incredible amount of time, I’ve tweaked the tiniest bits of sound to total exhaustion.

Should the grand piano have more mechanical noises… should the timpani have slightly more reverb… should the guitar have a delay or not, should I add the cello on top of the full orchestra, or an oboe? Should I widen the acoustic guitar or leave it as is? Is this chord harmonic enough for the one before? Is the Oberheim too loud? Should I use the Gibson EB0 or the Les Paul bass, finger or pick? Stratocaster or Telecaster? This or that cabinet, or none at all, what amp? Distortion or slight fuzz, tremolo?

The pains of creating an album…

Questions like that are bothering me all the time. And the production is so huge that my DAW crashes at least 3 times a day. Plus, anxiety, doubts… because “is it all worth it? Will they understand it?”. Sleepless nights. Then again: “fuck yeah!”. It all sounds absolutely heavenly, I get goosebumps all the time. And nothing is even mastered at all.

I have half of the album sounding as perfect as it gets, with the needed amount of imperfection to become perfect. I open parts of it again, again and again… stuff that I did a year ago that doesn’t sound right today, and may sound not right next week. You get the idea. 😉

No worries, it’s all good. It’s finished very soon. Once it’s done I have nothing to do with it anymore. Then it’s a product with a life of its own, and I will watch it learning to walk.

I will reply to all of your questions in a video that I’ll upload to Facebook and YouTube, very soon.

New Release: 5th Anniversary Compilation on Beatport – Buy my new track “Toska”!

Check out Ingo Vogelmann on Beatport.

Source: Daniel Bruns, Ingo Vogelmann, Red Robin, Robert Babicz, Der Dritte Raum, Laika & Strelka, Smith & Burns, DirrtyDishes, Vamos Art, Electric Kool Aid, Daniel Bruns, Traumhouse, Doc Ollinger, Mel Bell New Releases: 5th Anniversary Compilation on Beatport

Behind The Mask

This is how I want to remember Robin Williams. Positive and extremely nice.
This is how I want to remember Robin Williams. Positive and extremely nice.

This is not an obituary. There are enough people on the planet that are way better at this. Plus, I didn’t know Robin Williams personally, and I’m not a journalist. But Robin and I  — and so many other people in this world — have something in common, and that’s why this is a call for awareness.

The first thing I had to learn this morning when I woke up was: shit! I’m late. I’m supposed to drive the Missus to work!

Part of my waking-up-process is having a cigarette and checking my phone. Call it a ritual. Next up would be grabbing a coffee from the kitchen. I didn’t get this far. The news that Robin Williams (apparently, unconfirmed while I’m writing this) committed suicide was all over my phone.

Holy shit! I mean: holy motherfucking goddamn shit! How can this happen? How can someone bring so much joy into people’s hearts and be a totally sad man himself? What an actor, what an artist, what a great human being!

Robin Williams was very open about his addictions (cocaine, alcohol) and his depressions. This didn’t help enough, though. And no money, success and fame in the world could help him to overcome his struggles with life.

My distant relative Christopher Vogelmann, who’s a doctor himself (even when he’s “only” a chiropractor), said today:

Mental distress and mental illness affect more people than we readily know. Depression and addiction can hit those who are famous and those closest to us.

It is a sad moment as this great light of comedic genius has left us for a much larger stage.

and

The daily struggles can often be upsetting but the positive potential is equally strong.

We are as a nation ill-prepared to deal with mental illness. We often just stigmatize and warehouse those afflicted with mental illness – something that we would almost never do to a person with a physical illness.

He said it. I feel that this is all we need to know and think about right now and in the future.

I’m suffering from depressions all my life. I’ve had numerous moments when I wanted to end my life, because I couldn’t bear the deep sadness inside of me anymore. A sadness I couldn’t explain, one I could never find out where it was coming from. How do you pull out the rambling weeds when you can’t grab it at its roots?

funkagendaRead my fellow “workmate’s” thoughts on this, too, Funkagenda, who recently came out in public about his problems with depressions, drugs and alcohol.

I got it “under control”, kind of. The sadness and depressions are still there, but somehow I found a way to go through those phases. They have become infrequent, and I got meds that make it easier when they show up. I have had training all my life, to wear a mask, smile, so that no one would ever figure out what’s going on behind the mask.

The wish to just be dead and get rid of the pain then is still there. It’s mainly the responsibility for the hearts of the people surrounding me that keeps me away from leaving the stage of this life.

I’m sure Robin Williams had professional help, meds and loving people surrounding him. For a “normal” person, there would be so many good reasons to just be happy and enjoy life, but for Robin Williams all of this wasn’t enough, apparently.

I’m thinking about “why do people have problems like that” all my life. What the fuck is wrong? What makes people so sick, and why do I suffer from this, too? Is it a general sick world, full of ugliness and hatred? Does this produce so much negativity that some people just can’t deal with it? Are we not made for a society like that?

I remember a statement actor Gerard Depardieu gave when his only son died. It was something like

He wasn’t made for this world. He was a true poet, this world was too much for him. It’s okay that he’s at another place now where he can find peace for himself.

I was thinking that — as sad as it is — he is probably right.

I wish the world would be more lovely and less ugly. I wish people would treat each other with more respect and kindness. I wish money and status wouldn’t have the importance it has, and everyone could just live his life the way he wants without the constant pressure life puts on us.

Maybe there are individuals in this world that just can’t take all this ugliness. Maybe we put our wishes and our suffering into art, for the outside world to understand us better, to express ourselves, because words are so limited.

And some of of us obviously give the funny clown to overact the deep sadness inside of us, or to pretend that this world is an entirely beautiful place. Like Robin Williams.

P.S.: I didn’t write this to jump on a SEO bandwagon. I did it, because this topic affects me personally, and I think it helps others and myself to be as open as possible about it.
P.P.S.: I didn’t drive the Missus to work, the morning was all fucked up.

Update

This is Zelda Williams’ tweet after her father’s death: