Rumours About My Retirement — A Statement

Ingo Vogelmann
Not retired, yet.

There seems to be a rumour that I retired. Recently I also received messages from fans who asked me directly. I think it’s time to explain, and not just on this subject.

First of all: no. I haven’t retired, yet, nor do I plan so anytime soon. But I have either shut down or minimized certain activities that affect my work in the music industry, on the other hand, I draw my energy to other (and partially new) things.

About my management activities in the music industry

As you may know, I no longer work for FRISKY. I also removed my shows from the station, because I wanted it that way. I was not officially fired. At a certain point, FRISKY simply stopped communicating with me for reasons that to this day are incomprehensible to me, unless I suspected fraud. After all, I was the one who quit after nobody talked to me anymore. I got some sort of explanation (very much too late), but it wasn’t satisfactory at all. Despite the fact that it assumed completely false accusations that looked strongly like made up, for the sake of accusation. I can not spread the whole story publicly, it’s still a legal process that is far from over. I still have demands that I have to enforce in court.

With great pleasure I am Head of A&R for Pro B Tech Music. This job usually takes place in the background, which is why you do not notice much of it. But I am very busy. If you have demos, send them to me. 😉

Studio work

I direct my energy more and more to the work in the studio. That means I produce, mix, master and compose a lot, both for myself and for clients. That’s great fun. I couldn’t imagine quitting this, ever. I will probably do this until my very last breath. I just love music too much.

Radio shows

I do that. Still. As long as I enjoy it and my time allows it. I don’t know when the time has come when it stops being enough fun to continue, but you will notice.

Gigs

Quite clear: I’m picking out the really good ones. I’m tired of stupid discussions with promoters that do too much coke and have an incredibly inflated ego or want to fool me. I do not play for free drinks, travel expenses and hotel. BTW, I never did that.

To be honest: I have been involved in the music industry for about 25 years. I have experienced many beautiful things, seen many places and people and experienced unforgettable moments. But also many bitter disappointments. And I – 45 years old – do not feel like it anymore. Really not. I might be a bit stupid, but not that stupid.

And here is the most important thing…

Over the years, I have neglected far too many things. Friends and partnership, for example. Family. A normal life. I haven’t always given the really important people in my life the attention and energy they deserve. Although I always had the best intentions, I have been terrible on many subjects and fucked up opportunities.

At 45, I’m full of regrets that I need to process — believe it or not. Your own mistakes make you either go full retard (pardon the wording) or they make you humble and thoughtful. I want to be a better version of myself and live the life I could have lived earlier if I hadn’t clinged to stupid things and false perceptions. I also want to have more time and energy for private passions and hobbies, and I also want to really listen to the music I love more, not just skip through it, because I need to evaluate it.

I’m at an age where you do not have to get involved with everything or prove anything. I (almost) only do things that I enjoy doing. A few things I did before have only taken but not given back enough, or at all. Fuck this.

In a nutshell, I have no time or energy to waste. This life is short and will be over sooner or later, and I’m the only one responsible for my happiness until that day has come.

However, that’s the short explanation on the state of things. If necessary, I will explain more at some point. Thanks for your attention and for your support! I sincerely hope you understand what this is about, and what not.

12 Things You Should Never Say To a Musician

  1. So Are You Trying To Be A Musician

    I am a musician. Not trying. Trying to be a musician is watching the first YouTube video on how to hold a guitar. Not what I have done for the past 15 years. That is BEING a musician.

  2. You Sound Like…

    I know you’re trying to be nice by putting me in good company, but musicians want to feel original. We don’t want to hear we sound like everyone else. That we’re unoriginal. It’s fine for you to sell your friends on listening to someone new by comparing them to well known artists, but when talking to a musician, the best compliment is “you sound like YOU and it’s awesome.” Unless you’re talking to a pop producer, then yeah, “it sounds like Katy Perry” is probably the best compliment you could give.

  3. You Should Try Out For American Idol

    I will slap you.

  4. When Am I Going To Hear You On The Radio?

    When your radio plays better shit.

  5. You Should Be On The Voice

    Because that’s a career builder. Right Jermaine?

  6. You Must Love Karaoke

    No, actually, I hate karaoke because I have to listen to you sing.

  7. Can I Get On The List? Plus 1?

    You don’t have $10 to support my music, but you have $50 for the round of shots you just bought everyone?

  8. What’s Your Real Job?

    It’s this little field called music. It’s way more real than those TPS reports you put together for the Bobs.

  9. What’s Your Backup Plan

    What’s yours?

  10. It Will Be Great Exposure

    Meaning, it doesn’t pay. No thanks.

  11. I Have A Great Idea For A Song

    And I have a great idea on how you can fix my faucet better. But let’s keep these things to ourselves.

  12. Free Bird

    That stopped being funny in ’97.

 

Source: 12 Things You Should Never Say To a Musician | Digital Music News

Update on the album production

The album

I’ve done around 30 different mixes, tried like 10 different guitars, mixing the drum kit and making it sounding right has taken an incredible amount of time, I’ve tweaked the tiniest bits of sound to total exhaustion.

Should the grand piano have more mechanical noises… should the timpani have slightly more reverb… should the guitar have a delay or not, should I add the cello on top of the full orchestra, or an oboe? Should I widen the acoustic guitar or leave it as is? Is this chord harmonic enough for the one before? Is the Oberheim too loud? Should I use the Gibson EB0 or the Les Paul bass, finger or pick? Stratocaster or Telecaster? This or that cabinet, or none at all, what amp? Distortion or slight fuzz, tremolo?

The pains of creating an album…

Questions like that are bothering me all the time. And the production is so huge that my DAW crashes at least 3 times a day. Plus, anxiety, doubts… because “is it all worth it? Will they understand it?”. Sleepless nights. Then again: “fuck yeah!”. It all sounds absolutely heavenly, I get goosebumps all the time. And nothing is even mastered at all.

I have half of the album sounding as perfect as it gets, with the needed amount of imperfection to become perfect. I open parts of it again, again and again… stuff that I did a year ago that doesn’t sound right today, and may sound not right next week. You get the idea. 😉

No worries, it’s all good. It’s finished very soon. Once it’s done I have nothing to do with it anymore. Then it’s a product with a life of its own, and I will watch it learning to walk.

I will reply to all of your questions in a video that I’ll upload to Facebook and YouTube, very soon.

New Release: 5th Anniversary Compilation on Beatport – Buy my new track “Toska”!

Check out Ingo Vogelmann on Beatport.

Source: Daniel Bruns, Ingo Vogelmann, Red Robin, Robert Babicz, Der Dritte Raum, Laika & Strelka, Smith & Burns, DirrtyDishes, Vamos Art, Electric Kool Aid, Daniel Bruns, Traumhouse, Doc Ollinger, Mel Bell New Releases: 5th Anniversary Compilation on Beatport

Behind The Mask

This is how I want to remember Robin Williams. Positive and extremely nice.
This is how I want to remember Robin Williams. Positive and extremely nice.

This is not an obituary. There are enough people on the planet that are way better at this. Plus, I didn’t know Robin Williams personally, and I’m not a journalist. But Robin and I  — and so many other people in this world — have something in common, and that’s why this is a call for awareness.

The first thing I had to learn this morning when I woke up was: shit! I’m late. I’m supposed to drive the Missus to work!

Part of my waking-up-process is having a cigarette and checking my phone. Call it a ritual. Next up would be grabbing a coffee from the kitchen. I didn’t get this far. The news that Robin Williams (apparently, unconfirmed while I’m writing this) committed suicide was all over my phone.

Holy shit! I mean: holy motherfucking goddamn shit! How can this happen? How can someone bring so much joy into people’s hearts and be a totally sad man himself? What an actor, what an artist, what a great human being!

Robin Williams was very open about his addictions (cocaine, alcohol) and his depressions. This didn’t help enough, though. And no money, success and fame in the world could help him to overcome his struggles with life.

My distant relative Christopher Vogelmann, who’s a doctor himself (even when he’s “only” a chiropractor), said today:

Mental distress and mental illness affect more people than we readily know. Depression and addiction can hit those who are famous and those closest to us.

It is a sad moment as this great light of comedic genius has left us for a much larger stage.

and

The daily struggles can often be upsetting but the positive potential is equally strong.

We are as a nation ill-prepared to deal with mental illness. We often just stigmatize and warehouse those afflicted with mental illness – something that we would almost never do to a person with a physical illness.

He said it. I feel that this is all we need to know and think about right now and in the future.

I’m suffering from depressions all my life. I’ve had numerous moments when I wanted to end my life, because I couldn’t bear the deep sadness inside of me anymore. A sadness I couldn’t explain, one I could never find out where it was coming from. How do you pull out the rambling weeds when you can’t grab it at its roots?

funkagendaRead my fellow “workmate’s” thoughts on this, too, Funkagenda, who recently came out in public about his problems with depressions, drugs and alcohol.

I got it “under control”, kind of. The sadness and depressions are still there, but somehow I found a way to go through those phases. They have become infrequent, and I got meds that make it easier when they show up. I have had training all my life, to wear a mask, smile, so that no one would ever figure out what’s going on behind the mask.

The wish to just be dead and get rid of the pain then is still there. It’s mainly the responsibility for the hearts of the people surrounding me that keeps me away from leaving the stage of this life.

I’m sure Robin Williams had professional help, meds and loving people surrounding him. For a “normal” person, there would be so many good reasons to just be happy and enjoy life, but for Robin Williams all of this wasn’t enough, apparently.

I’m thinking about “why do people have problems like that” all my life. What the fuck is wrong? What makes people so sick, and why do I suffer from this, too? Is it a general sick world, full of ugliness and hatred? Does this produce so much negativity that some people just can’t deal with it? Are we not made for a society like that?

I remember a statement actor Gerard Depardieu gave when his only son died. It was something like

He wasn’t made for this world. He was a true poet, this world was too much for him. It’s okay that he’s at another place now where he can find peace for himself.

I was thinking that — as sad as it is — he is probably right.

I wish the world would be more lovely and less ugly. I wish people would treat each other with more respect and kindness. I wish money and status wouldn’t have the importance it has, and everyone could just live his life the way he wants without the constant pressure life puts on us.

Maybe there are individuals in this world that just can’t take all this ugliness. Maybe we put our wishes and our suffering into art, for the outside world to understand us better, to express ourselves, because words are so limited.

And some of of us obviously give the funny clown to overact the deep sadness inside of us, or to pretend that this world is an entirely beautiful place. Like Robin Williams.

P.S.: I didn’t write this to jump on a SEO bandwagon. I did it, because this topic affects me personally, and I think it helps others and myself to be as open as possible about it.
P.P.S.: I didn’t drive the Missus to work, the morning was all fucked up.

Update

This is Zelda Williams’ tweet after her father’s death:

Music

NEW!

In January 2018, I decided to offer all my music for which I own the copyrights* for free, now and in the future. “Free” means all music I have on my own label (L2 Music) can be downloaded for as low as zero (all currencies, smiles preferred) or for whatever amount you think is right, in the best possible quality! There are no hooks, eyelets or hidden conditions. There is just music.

You can either stream my music for free via Spotify or stream and/or download at Bandcamp.

Bandcamp

*Digital downloads, not physical products, of course. I have no influence on the price of my music that I have signed with other labels, hence I can not offer this for free. But all of my albums are on my own label, and most of my non-dance-music productions.

Of course, I will still do paid remixes (and receive royalties for those), and sign my music to other labels, mostly dance music productions. But music on my own label (my albums etc.) will be free from now on.

Why am I doing this?

It’s simple, really. There is no point in asking you to pay for the download of music files anymore when you can stream it for free already. Those who like to listen to music in top quality (the audiophiles among you), there are the free or pay-what-you-want downloads at Bandcamp.

Nevertheless, I would like to ask each one of you to support me by becoming my patron:

Become a Patron!

 

Thank you, no matter if you’re just a listener or paying subscriber/downloader. You’re all equally valuable to me.

If you don’t feel like supporting me on a regular (but one-time) basis, it would be nice if you’d…

 


Note: The music featured on this page is not my complete work, but the most important and recent.


Latest releases

Bagabond - Restless Warrior EP
“Bagabond is a very prolific electronic music producer who presents the EP ‘Restless Warrior’ on Pro B Tech. The intriguing title honors the content of the entire album. A ruthless warrior on a rousing adventure that takes place on faded melody lines that help you dance your way through this journey. This record contains three tracks and one of them is a vibrant remix by Ingo Vogelmann.”

 

“X” (2016)

 

“The Great Escape” (2014)

What some other people say about the album:

 

“GOD” (2006 / 2016 10 Years Special Remastered Edition)

 

SoundCloud

HearThis

About

Artist Biography

Oh Germany, what a land: best beer, best cars, no highway speed limits, best bread, nudist culture, castles, poetry, science, inventions, social safety, bureaucracy (a lot of it), humour on a meta level (not to be confused with ‘no humour’, after all, Germans are very precise in everything), and… ? Right, extremely talented musicians. You have to be confident, brave and full of love for your art, in a society that values nothing more than safety and considers the art of creating music at most a “hobby”.

Some Germans really know about doing things right or not doing them at all. So here comes German Ingo Vogelmann. For him, the secret to great music is this simple formula: < = >

Less is more. Music as a form of communication. Less meaningless chatter, more meaningful music.

To Ingo Vogelmann music is living, not only as a part of his every day routine, but as the driving force of his existence. Whether spending hours discovering new music, writing and recording his own productions, editing and mastering for other musicians, or just enjoying the sounds that surround him, Ingo’s life is intertwined with the music he loves. It’s his communication to the world, his avenue for expressing the stories that need to be told, and his connection with those who feel the same.

Waking up with melodies in his head, he creates music that comes to him subconsciously, music that is necessary to tell the tale of mankind and our place on this planet. His palette is unlimited and unrestricted; as a classically trained instrumentalist he produces and performs the music that comes to him in whatever form that may be, regardless of genre or style. If the music is asking to be shared, he will tell its story.

In the studio, Ingo is a wizard of sound, handling the entire process of production from writing, to performing, to mastering, with care and attention to the minute details of the music and aural experience. With 8 albums and over 150 singles and remixes, he is consistently creating something fresh. The studio is where his love truly shines through, where he shares his messages through the music, and the magic of sound is given the space to shine.

This passion carries beyond the studio and into the DJ booth, where Ingo’s electronic music expressions connect deeply with the audience, inspiring interaction with the crowd as a part of the greater picture they build together. He creates a vibrant scene full of deep beats and transformative melodies, enveloping the space and leading them into an unforgettable experience. From the moment he gets behind the decks, his music talks: “Come with me, I have something to show you, a story to tell.” This story may evolve throughout the night, based on feedback from the audience and the journey they want to go on, and Ingo Vogelmann is always ready to take them wherever that may lead.

No matter what form his music takes, Ingo Vogelmann is always ready to share it, with seemingly unlimited dedication and devotion. Tune in to his sound, and experience the messages that come from the depths of the music.

Born in Germany and having been a global traveler who has lived all across Europe and Asia, Ingo Vogelmann always takes the music with him, and is always sharing that music with us through his many channels. Stay tuned to experience the next part of his epic musical journey – we may not know where the path will lead, but it will surely sound good along the way.

Short profile

  • Composer, producer, recording, mixing and mastering engineer, instrumentalist (mainly drums & percussion, and whatever’s needed and works).
  • Composer and producer for media, film, TV and commissioned work for other people.
  • Head Of A&R at Pro B Tech Records since 2017.
  • Founder, owner, CEO and Head of A&R at L2 Music since 2003.
  • Show host/resident DJ at FRISKY from 2005 to 2018.
  • Executive Director at FRISKY from 2005 to 2018, a groundbreaking electronic music internet radio and subscription service.
  • Inventor of The Ultimate Harmonic Mixing & Composing Chart™.
  • Inventor of harmoodizr™.

Please, head this way if you need more info, material or resources.