Danny Tenaglia Brooklyn Cover

An Homage to Danny Tenaglia

In the rich tapestry of electronic music, Danny Tenaglia stands as an artist whose works transcend genre boundaries and touch the heartstrings of listeners. His latest magnum opus, “GU45: Brooklyn,” is more than just a DJ mix album; it is the essence of a life dedicated to curating soundscapes that defy norms and embody the soul of a city. It’s a journey through House music, and it bangs like only Danny Tenaglia can make it bang.

Brooklyn: A Love Letter

“Brooklyn” is an homage to Williamsburg, Brooklyn – the cradle of Danny’s musical odyssey. Comprising 42 tracks, the album is a rich collection of stories narrated through the beats of artists like Guy J, Moderat, Ralph Falcon, and Monika Kruse. It serves as the perfect finale to the Global Underground series, which already features milestones in Tenaglia’s career like “Athens” and “London” which I as a young DJ grew up with.

In my opinion, “Brooklyn” is the best of Danny. Ever.

Tenaglia’s career is a sequence of moments that have shaped not just a genre but the entire club culture. From his beginnings at Paradise Garage to his influential stint at Cheers in Miami, he has always created soundscapes that cross boundaries.

His remix of “Surrender Yourself” in 1992 was more than just a hit; it was an expression of his musical ethos. “Mix This Pussy” (1994) and his residency at Twilo (1996) further solidified his status as a visionary.

When I met Danny about 15 years ago at the Winter Music Conference in Miami, I encountered a person whose warmth and attentiveness were as profound as his music. He is just the the nicest and sweetest guy, and an artist whose heartbeat syncs with the rhythm of the people on the dance floor.

Personal Battle

Lately, Danny’s life took a turn when he disclosed his battle with colon cancer. This revelation was not a note of defeat but a testament to his indomitable spirit. His message was clear – life, like music, is a journey through ups and downs, and one must approach it with the same passion one brings to the turntables.

As Danny continues his treatment, with the future’s uncertainty looming, his dedication to his craft remains unshaken. He stands as a beacon of strength, reminding us of the power of music to heal, unite, and inspire.

A Symphony of Resilience

Danny Tenaglia’s story is more than the sum of his albums or the clubs he has transformed. It is a narrative of resilience, a reminder of the enduring power of art in the face of life’s unpredictability. “Brooklyn” is more than just an album; it’s a chapter in the life of a man whose music will continue to echo through the annals of time.

As I listen to the driving and soul-stirring rhythms of “Brooklyn,” I’m not just hearing music; I’m experiencing the heartbeat of a true legend.

I wish Danny a full recovery and only the best, from the bottom of my heart.

Ingo Vogelmann Bereft

New Album: “Bereft” • 3 Nov 2023

I am thrilled to announce the upcoming release of my new album, “Bereft“, available on all major platforms on November 3, 2023. This project ventures into the darker realms of music, creating an atmosphere reminiscent of voyaging through both calm and wild waters. With 9 meticulously crafted tracks, the album offers a blend of symphonic textures, glitchy rhythm work, and grand piano, enveloping listeners in a wide, epic soundscape. Mark your calendars and get ready to embark on a sonic voyage with “Bereft“.

red and orange galaxy illustration

Why I’m a Pantheist. And What About My Album “GOD”?

From my earliest memories, the universe has always been a source of profound fascination. The night sky, a tapestry of stars and cosmic wonder, seemed to pose questions that penetrated the very core of my being. My quest for answers led me through various domains – religion, philosophy, and empirical science. Yet, none offered the holistic understanding I yearned for. That is, until I discovered Pantheism.

At its core, Pantheism is a worldview that is both elegantly simple and profoundly deep: the universe and everything within it is divine. But let’s clarify what I mean by “divine,” as it’s a term often misunderstood. For me, divinity is not about an anthropomorphic God sitting on a celestial throne. I’m an atheist in that regard, finding no logical or empirical basis for such a deity. Instead, my sense of the divine is rooted in the inherent order that permeates the universe – an order that allows for the existence and functioning of all things.

This divine order is not a set of commandments but a natural, self-organizing system that can be observed in everything from the laws of physics to the complexity of biological systems. It’s the reason why planets orbit stars, why ecosystems maintain their balance, and why we, as conscious beings, can ponder our place in the cosmos. This order is the closest thing to “God” in my Pantheistic view, and it’s an understanding that fills me with awe and wonder.

When I first encountered the concept of quantum entanglement, it felt like a scientific affirmation of this divine order. Here were particles, separated by vast distances, yet intrinsically connected in a way that defied classical understanding. It was as if the universe itself was giving a nod to the Pantheistic idea of interconnectedness, an inherent feature of this divine order.

The first law of thermodynamics further resonated with my Pantheistic beliefs. This law, stating that energy cannot be created or destroyed but only transformed, seemed like another expression of this divine order. It’s a principle that can be observed in the water cycle, where water evaporates, forms clouds, and returns as rain, never being destroyed but merely changing form. This eternal cycle of energy and matter is a testament to the inherent order that governs all things.

The cyclical nature of the universe, as suggested by theories like the Big Bang and the Big Crunch, also aligns with this view. These theories propose a universe in a constant cycle of birth, expansion, and eventual contraction, mirroring the eternal cycles that are a cornerstone of Pantheistic thought and another manifestation of this divine order.

The concept of emergence, where complex systems arise from the interactions of simpler entities, offers yet another glimpse into this inherent order. Consider a termite mound: each termite contributes to a complex, self-regulating system, a microcosm of the divine order that I see as permeating the universe at all levels.

Fractals, with their infinitely complex patterns that are self-similar across scales, serve as a beautiful metaphor for this divine order. Whether it’s the branching of trees, the course of rivers, or the structure of our lungs, these fractal patterns are a testament to the inherent order that underlies all existence.

So, why am I a Pantheist? Because Pantheism offers a framework that harmonizes the spiritual with the scientific. It provides a lens through which the mysteries and realities of existence can be explored and appreciated. In embracing Pantheism, I’ve found a spiritual home that satisfies my intellectual curiosity, fills my soul with a sense of divine wonder, and aligns perfectly with my atheistic rejection of a traditional deity. For me, Pantheism is not just a belief; it’s a profound understanding of the divine order that makes us, and everything around us, a part of this wondrous cosmos.

The Irony of “God”: My Musical Perspective

Now, you might be wondering about my album titled “GOD.” I have never explained this. This is a first.

Contrary to what the title might suggest, it’s not a religious work. In fact, it’s quite the opposite – it’s a satire, a commentary on how religious teachings, particularly those surrounding figures like Jesus, have been misunderstood and distorted over time.

I have immense respect for Jesus as a historical figure. He was a revolutionary who preached love, tolerance, and understanding in a time when such ideas were radical. However, I believe that his messages have been twisted and turned into something he never intended. My album “God” aims to poke fun at this religious misinterpretation while also shedding light on how I see the divine order that governs the universe.

Back then I have been accused of blasphemy and even been threatened by religious fanatics.

In the album, I explore themes that resonate with my Pantheistic beliefs, using music as a medium to express the inherent order and interconnectedness that I see in the cosmos. It’s my way of challenging conventional religious thought and encouraging listeners to consider a more harmonious and scientifically coherent understanding of divinity.

So, when you listen to “GOD,” know that it’s not an homage to a deity in the sky but a musical journey that invites you to question, explore, and ultimately find your own understanding of the divine order that makes this universe so incredibly awe-inspiring.