Keto Bread

My Keto Bread

I’m a firm believer that Germans bake the best bread on the planet, and boy… do I love bread! Unfortunately, the tastiest food is almost always full of carbs. As a general food lover who is 51 (at the time of this article) and tends to be on the stronger side of physical appearance – to put it carefully – I am committed to avoiding carbs like the devil avoids holy water, eating healthy and stay relatively lean.

This Keto Bread recipe is perfect for satisfying my bread cravings while keeping my diet on track. It’s extremely low in carbs, high in healthy fats and protein, and really delicious. Give it a try and enjoy a guilt-free proper German-style bread!

Ingredients

  • 250 g (2 cups) almond flour
  • 50 g (1/2 cup) flaxseed meal
  • 6 g (0.2 oz) ground psyllium husk (1 tbsp)
  • 12 g (0.4 oz) baking powder (1 tbsp)
  • 5 g (0.18 oz) salt (1 tsp)
  • 15 g (0.5 oz) apple cider vinegar (1 tbsp)
  • 5 eggs
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup or 2 fl oz) olive oil or melted butter
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup or 4 fl oz) hot water

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven: Preheat your oven to 175°C (350°F) and prepare a loaf pan by greasing it or lining it with parchment paper.

  2. Mix dry ingredients: In a large bowl, thoroughly mix the almond flour, flaxseed meal, ground psyllium husk, baking powder, and salt.

  3. Add wet ingredients: In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, apple cider vinegar, and olive oil (or melted butter). Not the hot water!

  4. Make the dough: Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix well. Gradually add the hot water while stirring until the dough is thick and evenly mixed.

  5. Bake: Pour the dough into the prepared loaf pan and spread it evenly. Bake in the preheated oven for about 45-50 minutes, until the bread is golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

  6. Let cool: Remove the bread from the oven and let it cool in the pan for about 10 minutes. Then take it out of the pan and let it cool completely on a wire rack.

Nutritional Information per Slice (assuming 12 slices per loaf)

  • Calories: approx. 190
  • Fat: 16 g
  • Protein: 7 g
  • Carbohydrates: 3 g
  • Fiber: 2 g
  • Net Carbs: 1 g

Nutritional Information per 100 g

  • Calories: approx. 297 kcal
  • Fat: approx. 25 g
  • Protein: approx. 11 g
  • Carbohydrates: approx. 5 g
  • Fiber: approx. 3 g
  • Net Carbs: approx. 1.5 g

Total Nutritional Information for the Entire Loaf

  • Calories: approx. 2280 kcal
  • Fat: approx. 192 g
  • Protein: approx. 84 g
  • Carbohydrates: approx. 36 g
  • Fiber: approx. 24 g
  • Net Carbs: approx. 12 g

What Are Net Carbs?

Net carbs are the carbohydrates that your body can digest and convert into glucose, which can affect your blood sugar levels. They are calculated by subtracting the fiber content from the total carbohydrates. Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body cannot digest, so it doesn’t raise your blood sugar levels.

Net carbs are especially important for those following a low-carb or ketogenic diet because they focus on the carbs that impact blood sugar.

This bread is extremely low in net carbs.

Enjoy this homemade Keto Bread!

The Story of Hans

When I first met Hans in 1978, I didn’t immediately grasp the depth of the scars history had etched into his life. He was a man of few words, whose eyes, however, spoke volumes—if one was willing to read them. Today, as the echoes of past mistakes threaten to be drowned out by the currents of right-wing ideology in Germany and Europe, I feel compelled to share his story. It’s not just the tale of a broken man but a warning and a plea to our collective memory.

Hans was born in 1926 in Mülheim an der Ruhr, in the industrial heartland of Germany, into a world still reeling from the scars of the First World War. The political and economic instability of the Weimar Republic shaped his early years, a time of turmoil that eventually laid the groundwork for one of the darkest chapters in human history. At 17, as the world plunged once more into the abyss of war, Hans was conscripted into the Wehrmacht and sent to the Eastern Front. There, in the icy grip of the Russian winter, he experienced the brutality of war in its most raw form.

The injury Hans sustained from a grenade, which tore away a large part of his lung, was just the beginning of a long ordeal. Captured by Soviet forces, Hans was transported to a prisoner of war camp in Siberia, a place synonymous with desolation and harshness. Despite his severe injury and the brutal environment, Hans clung to life with a tenacity that was both remarkable and heartrending. The cold, the hunger, the back-breaking labor—all left marks that never fully healed.

The war eventually ended, but Hans’ battle did not. The journey back to Germany was a slow and torturous process, fraught with bureaucratic hurdles and the physical challenges of his still-healing wounds. Upon his return, the joy of reunion with his family was overshadowed by the realization that he, and the nation itself, would never be the same.

His own father didn’t recognize him, and his death certificate already hung framed in the living room—a symbolic image of what the war had made of him: a man the world had already given up on.

The road to physical recovery was long and fraught with complications. The loss of a huge part of his lung meant that Hans would forever be short of breath, a constant reminder of the war’s impact on his body. Yet, it was the invisible wounds that proved harder to heal.

Hans eventually found work at AEG Kanis in Essen, where he worked as an auditor. Yet, the shadows of the past never left him. Alcohol became his constant companion, an attempt to numb the inner demons that haunted him at night. When AEG Kanis closed and Hans went into early retirement, he lost an important anchor in his life. The years that followed were marked by a slow but steady decline that culminated in his death from cirrhosis of the liver. The memories of the horrors he had witnessed and endured haunted him, leading him to seek solace in alcohol, a refuge that would eventually claim his life.

I accompanied Hans in his final years and witnessed how an incredibly strong man was slowly destroyed by his memories and alcohol. I heard only a few of his war stories, but each one deeply moved me and haunts me to this day. They were windows into a soul too deeply wounded to ever fully heal.

The journey of Hans from the moment of his grievous injury on the Eastern Front to his eventual return home is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit amidst the darkest of times. After the grenade tore away one of his lungs, Hans found himself not just battling for his life on the frozen battlefields but also facing a long and arduous path to recovery that would test his limits in every conceivable way.

I aim not only to tell Hans’ story but also to shine a light on the shadows that, decades later, threaten to spread across Europe once again. The resurgence of right-wing ideology, the increasing polarization of our society, and the allure of simple answers to complex questions are alarming parallels to the conditions that once paved the way for the rise of National Socialism.

We must not allow history to repeat itself. We need to keep the memories of people like Hans alive, not just as a monument to the horrors of war but as a warning against the dangers that arise when hatred and intolerance are allowed to flourish unchecked. I wish we could stand together for a world where the dignity of every individual is respected and where the horrors of the past are not forgotten but used as lessons for the future.

Hans’ story is one among many, but it stands as a testament to the countless fates destroyed by war and hatred. By telling it, we not only remember the suffering that was but also commit ourselves to working for a better, more peaceful future.

Hans was my stepfather.

He entered our lives when I was 5 years old. He was a complex character, yet absolutely reliable and a role model to me in many ways. Today, I realize what an incredible and decent person he was. He was only 66 years old when he passed away. He lived much longer than any doctor had predicted for him, and aside from the alcohol, he truly made the most out of this life. And he inspired a boy whose biological father was mostly absent.

I miss him dearly.

yellow tent under starry night

My 50 Simple Pleasures in Life

Life is a series of moments, some grand and some simple. While the grand moments often steal the spotlight, it’s the simple pleasures that really make my journey worthwhile. As someone who has lived in various corners of the world and experienced life’s many facets, I’ve come to appreciate these small joys most. They are the unsung heroes that add color to my days and warmth to my soul. Here’s a list of 50 simple pleasures – inspired by this – that make my life great.

  1. The first sip of morning coffee when my house is quiet.
  2. A long, hilly hike with breathtaking views.
  3. The sense of accomplishment after finishing a challenging project.
  4. The first cold beer on vacation.
  5. Walking through a snow-covered landscape, feeling the crunch under my boots.
  6. The smell of rain hitting hot asphalt.
  7. Pouring a glass of wine perfectly without spilling a drop.
  8. Hearing an old favorite song on the radio.
  9. The sound of wind rustling through the trees on a quiet day.
  10. A juicy ribeye steak fresh off the grill.
  11. The satisfaction of completing a difficult bikepacking route.
  12. Seeing a mountain range in the distance.
  13. A freshly cleaned E-Bike, ready for the next adventure.
  14. Sitting around a campfire, enjoying the natural surroundings.
  15. Finishing a good book and feeling content.
  16. A deep and meaningful conversation with friends.
  17. A clear night sky filled with stars.
  18. Nailing the perfect mix or master in my music studio.
  19. The earthy smell of freshly cut wood.
  20. A spontaneous bikepacking adventure.
  21. The joy of discovering a new hiking trail.
  22. A moment of genuine, natural gratitude.
  23. The feeling of heavy muscles after a good workout.
  24. Capturing a great photo or video during one of my outdoor activities.
  25. A moment of solitude, far away from crowds and noise.
  26. Strumming my guitar and losing myself in the music.
  27. The thrill of reaching a summit and looking out over the landscape.
  28. Discovering a new track that I can’t stop listening to.
  29. Watching a distant thunderstorm roll in.
  30. The feeling of freedom when I turn off my phone for a day.
  31. Diving into genealogy and connecting with my past.
  32. The rush of wind against my face as I bike downhill.
  33. Taking an unplanned detour and discovering something new.
  34. Watching the sunset and reflecting on the day.
  35. The satisfaction of fixing something that’s broken.
  36. The freedom of an open road and endless possibilities.
  37. Using an old tool that still works perfectly.
  38. Dipping my feet in a cold stream on a hot day.
  39. Writing with a pen that glides effortlessly on paper.
  40. Walking through morning fog when the world seems softer.
  41. The thrill of a fast E-Bike ride.
  42. The excitement of releasing a new music track.
  43. The first snowfall of the season.
  44. The smell of freshly brewed coffee filling my house.
  45. The satisfaction of solving a complex problem at work.
  46. The feeling of sand between my toes.
  47. The adrenaline rush from an extreme outdoor activity.
  48. The peacefulness of a deserted beach.
  49. The joy of cooking a new recipe to perfection.
  50. The comfort of my favorite old sweatshirt.

While the list is personal, I believe that the essence of these joys is universal. They remind us to pause, to breathe, and to savor the small moments that often go unnoticed. In a world that’s increasingly complex and demanding, these simple pleasures are my sanctuary, my moments of zen.

I hope you find your own simple pleasures that make your journey just as rewarding.